Booze, Beans, & Biscuits

As I began to write this post, I was in a severe food comma. We had just got home from brunch at Nick’s on Broadway. If you’ve never been, drop what you’re doing grab a flight/train/cab/get in your car, and go right now. This place is really fantastic, and the people in Providence definitely know it. Although there’s almost always a wait,  it is well worth it, it ought to be considered a kind of event anyways!

Alexis, my roommate, and I went for lunch on Saturday to celebrate my 21st birthday that was on Friday. There was food, of  course, but because we were celebrating my 21st, I think it’s best that I mention the booze first. How can people drink bloody mary’s? And enjoy them?! I felt compelled to order the classic brunch cocktail that morning, but it did not fly. Whether it’s this specific recipe or my perception of bloody mary’s in general, ick, never again, not for me. We definitely recuperated from that offense when we tried Alexis’ white sangria and my Cocchi Americano. Cocchi Americano is an aperitif, meaning a low alcohol drink meant to “stimulate the appetite”. And Cocchi Americano is a “fortified [meaning added alcohol] Moscato d’Asti wine steeped with bitter, quinine-rich cinchona bark, citrus peel, and other botanicals.” Basically, you got some wine, you make it a little stronger, add some other flavoring elements, and serve it on it’s own or in other drinks. In this particular instance, it was served with a few lemon sections and a bit of soda water. It certainly did it’s job to whet the apetite and and was particularly delicious. Bought myself a bottle at work a few hours later!

Mess
Conglomerate of liquids with varying and contrasting effects

After the long wait, between waiting for a table and for our orders to arrive, we enjoyed a DELICIOUS meal of Fried Eggs over Black Beans (with a biscuit on the side) and Fried Eggs over Pork and Bean Cassoulet. The biscuit was so yummy, they clearly pay some attention to these tasty, crunchy, buttered goodies. Not to sound too cliché, but it is the little things. If even the humble biscuits are a prime product, you can be assured of the quality of everything else that comes from that kitchen. The black beans were so flavorful, they really took the dish to a whole ‘nother level from brunch food. I was incredibly satisfied, body, mind, and soul-wise after that meal. We finished with a caramel bread pudding, which was just fine. A bite started great but finished with a raw whole wheat flavor.

Black BeansCassoulet

Biscuit

Bread Pudding

I noticed something worth mentioning that day. When I go out to eat, I like to take my time. I like to linger over my food, enjoy extended conversation with my friends, really make an event of the experience. I need the 2 hours, if I’m allowed it, to pay some attention to my food and comfortably value the time I have dedicated.

I strongly recommend this restaurant for any meal, although I’ve only experienced the breakfast/brunch menu. It is a wonderful place because the chef, Derek Wagner, is committed to incorporating local farmers and producers in his dishes. I realize the whole “local food movement” seems like some trend, but it needs to become the way we do things in order to support a sustainable agricultural system.

p.s. Here’s a great little website I stumbled on, The Perennial Plate. These short episodes they post are a great way to feed the travel bug in you. I don’t know much about the site, or filmmakers, but I like what they’re doing.

http://www.theperennialplate.com/episodes/2012/11/episode-106-for-udon-and-country/

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4 thoughts on “Booze, Beans, & Biscuits

  1. That’s the thing about bloody marys. When they’re good, they’re great and totally hit the spot, but when they’re bad, they’re undrinkable and just straight up painful.

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